About Us

VOYAGERS organises by-invitation adventures designed to build close connections between exceptional people, with the goal of accelerating positive impact. Relationships deepen through our regular video calls, group chats and in-person dinner salons.

What we do

At VOYAGERS, we bring together unusually interesting individuals from diverse backgrounds, industries and geographies for curated activities in magical places. You commit time, engagement and openness; we provide an intense schedule designed to build genuine connections. Our goal through these not-for-profit adventures is to build deep peer support over members’ lifelong personal journeys, and to leverage the collective brainpower to surface and help solve a few of the group’s own challenges. The adventures are the starting point for building a community of trust where we actively look to help each other. We build the community through regular video calls, meet-ups, dinners and group chats.

We have specialist groups themed around health-tech and climate-tech, and we organise dedicated adventures for people working in these fields. We also have a wider community made up of a diverse group whose work ranges from entrepreneurship and entertainment to human-rights activism and investment. To join VOYAGERS, we ask that you are a giver rather than a taker, and will actively engage with the community. We mostly recruit via introductions from existing members.

VOYAGERS is led by David Rowan, founding editor-in-chief of WIRED UK (2009-17) and author of Non-Bullshit Innovation (Penguin, May 2019). David advises and invests in early-stage tech companies and travels frequently to understand emerging trends. VOYAGERS began as his way to connect some of the inspiring people he meets, from sectors ranging from startups to entertainment to human rights, over experiences curated with care.

What
we do

Our purpose

Our Purpose
By DAVID ROWAN, VOYAGERS FOUNDER

Dinner salons were my gateway drug. Bring together 15 or 16 driven and diverse people in a private room, lead a single-thread conversation around themes that prompt honesty and even vulnerability, and frame the discussion in ways that minimise ego. So no surnames or job titles when you’re introducing yourself: just a first name, something that’s excited you today, and a brief answer to an engaging question such as: “If you had to spend $1 billion in the next year, what would you do with it?” (Kevin Kelly, WIRED’s first editor, suggested that provocation at one dinner, which typically prompted visionary plans for rethinking education or decarbonising industry; although when I used it at a subsequent dinner, Steve Case, the AOL founder, smiled mischievously and said: “Yes, I did have that problem once…”)

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Our Purpose

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